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When is Black Body Radiation OK?

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CITATION “When is Black Head Radiation OK?” by Emily E. Brown, MD, FACEP, LPN.

Retrieved January 21, 2019, from http://www.academicpsychology.org/content/26/1/5.shorten/article/when-is-black-head-radiation-ok?source_src_text_type=none&source_link_type_name=Article&link_title_id=10&link._author_id=-2&link.author_name_id_type=-1&link__author_page_id=”10″ title When Black Body Radiation OK?

by Emily Brown, DrPH, FACEM, LNPs, and other researchers article The medical profession is under fire for a lack of knowledge about the impact of Black Body and Hair Radiation (BBR) on the health of Black people and communities.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) states that there are more Black people dying from radiation-related cancers and the American Association of Cancer Research (AACR) reports that black women experience higher rates of cancer, stroke, and heart disease than white women.

But how do Black women know what to expect when they visit their doctor, nurse, or physician assistant?

According to a recent report by the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC), the following are some of the common questions that physicians and nurse practitioners should be asking their patients about BBR: Do I need to be checked out for radiation?

How long do I need my BBR?

What is the level of radiation?

What can I expect to happen to my body when I do get my BRI?

Is my Bbr safe?

Do I have any medical conditions that could increase my risk of cancer?

The AAMC report provides a list of common misconceptions and myths about Bbr, which include: The level of BBR is not always equal to the level in the community.

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